‘Golden Rule’ — Beautiful, Universal and Very, Very Old

By Wendy Thomas Russell | July 15, 2013 | 6 comments

It is a common misconception that the Golden Rule began with Jesus.

In fact, it’s part of the reason some Christians think of their religion as synonymous with morality. After all, to treat others the way you want to be treated is the essence of moral conduct. And it was Luke 6:31 in the New Testament that quotes Jesus as saying: “As ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.” (Matthew 7:1-5 also addresses the topic.)

But Jesus didn’t invent the ethic of reciprocity anymore than did Muhammad, who said: “The most righteous of men is the one who is glad that men should have what is pleasing to himself, and who dislikes for them what is for him disagreeable.” (circa 570-632 AD)

No, the Golden Rule existed long before Christianity or Islam. In fact, no one is quite sure when the idea was first written, much less conceived — it’s that old. All we know is that the general idea is as ubiquitous as it is beautiful — having existed in virtually every culture on Earth for thousands of years.

The Golden Rule

Here’s Plato: “I would have no one touch my property, if I can help it, or disturb it in the slightest way without my consent. If I am a man of reason, I must treat other’s property the same way.” (circa 387 BCE)

Confucius said: “What you do not like if done to yourself, do not do to others.” (circa 500 BCE)

The Sutrakritanga, part of the Jain Canons, put it quite succinctly: “One should treat all being as he himself would be treated.” (circa the 4th Century BCE)

Even the Mahabharata, an ancient Indian epic written in Sanskrit, included the passage: “The knowing person is minded to treat all being as himself.” (circa 800 BCE)

Then there’s the Jewish Torah, written in 1280 BCE: “Take heed to thyself, my child, in all they works, and be discreet in all thy behavior; and what thou thyself hatest, do to no man.”

Undated is this charming African Bush proverb: “If your neighbor’s jackal escapes into your garden, you should return the animal to its owner; that is how you would want your neighbor to treat you.”

This sort of hilarious version is a Nigerian Yoruba proverb: “One going to take a pointed stick to pinch a baby bird should first try it on himself to feel how it hurts.”

And a Sioux prayer puts it this way: “Great spirit, grant that I may not criticize my neighbor until I have walked a mile in his moccasins.”

Among the oldest known references appears in the story of The Eloquent Peasant, an ancient Egyptian story that dates back to The Middle Kingdom: 2040–1650 BCE (!): “Now this is the command: Do to the doer to cause that he do thus to you.”

The Golden Rule (so named sometime in the 17th Century, by the way) is arguably the greatest wisdom human beings have ever offered the world. It’s universally known, pondered  and accepted. And it’s a hallmark of virtually every major religion, philosophy and ethical perspective.

So… why don’t we follow it?

“We have committed the golden rule to memory, let us now commit it to life.” — Edwin Markham, 1852-1940.

[Most of the information in this post came from Sandra and Harold Darling, who compiled a wonderful ruler-shaped book called The Golden Rule  in 2006. It costs $7 on Amazon.]


6 comments

  1. Charlie says:

    There is so much in the Bible, especially in the New Testament and sayings attributed to Jesus, that are obviously taken from older religions or sayings that pretty much prove the fallacy of the bible itself. Much of it is a rehash of older myths and pagan and religious beliefs from decades or centuries before the items in question.

  2. Mickey says:

    In fact, we have yet to find a society, no matter how remote, that does not apply this notion. We understand this to be an inborn trait of our biology. There is an evolutionary benefit to intelligent, highly social species with this psychology.

    It is just part of being a human being, in other words. It is not taught, nor learned. Our outward display of this changes dramatically with new information. This is why old, remote societies may have expressions to this end that would seem quite vile to those in educated, developed worlds. We simply have more information about our consequences upon the conscious well-being of others.

  3. Maryellen says:

    I loved this post, so I’m leaving a comment to tell you…
    Because that’s what I want people to do when they like MY posts. ;-)

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Due out in March 2015, Relax, It's Just God: How and Why to Talk to Your Kids About Religion When You're Not Religious offers a well-researched look at a timely subject: secular parenting. With chapters on avoiding indoctrination, talking about death, vaccinating kids against intolerance, dealing with religious baggage, and getting along with religious relatives, the book offers a refreshingly compassionate approach to raising religiously literate, highly tolerant and critically thinking children capable of making up their own minds about what to believe. The book may be pre-ordered by visiting Brown Paper Press.
 

      Natural Wonderers is a new blog hosted by Wendy Thomas Russell and published by the Patheos faith network. An extension of Russell's previous blog — Relax, It's Just God — Natural Wonderers offers stories and advice on raising curious, compassionate children in secular families.
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