5 Reasons to ‘Design Your Own Deity’

By Wendy Thomas Russell | April 7, 2014 | 2 comments

FridgeWhen I first found this “Design Your Own Deity” magnetic play set, I was a little pissed at you.

Yes, you. All 15 of you.

Because if you guys would have just TOLD me that this existed, I would not have been forced to find it, completely randomly, behind a bunch of other cheese-ball stuff at a warehouse-sized gift emporium in Palm Springs this weekend.

“Seriously,” I thought, holding this priceless* item in my hands and trying to conjure each of your 15 faces. “Do you guys even know me anymore? There is literally nothing I want more in this world than to make a house of worship on my refrigerator.”

Then  it occurred to me that maybe you guys weren’t fuckwits at all.

Maybe — just maybe — YOU didn’t know this existed, either. It’s a theory that was reinforced once I got up to the counter and even the store clerk acted shocked about my purchase. “That’s great!” he said, turning it over to inspect the back. “Where did you find it?”

Anyway, I’m really sorry about the fuckwits thing. That was wrong. I love you guys more than you know.

Warning

Now, a little about the magnets: Made by the Unemployed Philosopher’s Guild, the set includes the following deities (I’ve linked to their Wiki definitions): Ganesha, Jehovah, Paleolithic Goddess, Cocijo, Tlingit Eagle,  Jesus, Medusa, Yeshe Khandro, Xenu (Xenu!), Isis, Zeus, Buddha, Satan, Flying Spaghetti Monster, the Burning Bush, and a bunch of “divine paraphernalia.” Now, please, go buy one for yourself.

Here’s why:

1. Diversity. “God” is not the only god in town. Humanity in general is very fond of deities, and has been for a long time. All of us — particularly Americans, and even more particularly, Americans with children —would do well to be reminded of that once in a while.

DYI Deity2.  Tolerance. I know I’m beginning to sound like a broken record on this, but we parents need to be looking everywhere for chances to inject religious literacy into our kids’ lives. Children are far more likely to show tolerance/ kindness/compassion for those who believe differently than they do, if  they’re exposed in a genuinely interesting way to what others believe.

3. Culture. Whether deities exist or not, the stories behind them are born of people who live in a specific time and place. The look and feel of each deity reflects the culture of those who created them. Showing interest in religion is a way to show interest in other people’s cultures — always a good thing.

DYI Deities

4. Independence. According to a survey I conducted for my book, 90 percent of secular parents truly do want their children to make up their own minds about what to believe. But how can kids be expected to do that unless they know what the options are? What core beliefs do each of these deities represent? And what’s stopping our kids from mashing these deities together — or inventing their own? It’s terrific food for thought.

5. Humor. Religion needs to lighten up a little; it always has. And there are few better ways to force that issue than to put a Jesus head onto a Flying Spaghetti Monster torso with Zeus legs. Period. 

I’d imagine that, in my home at least, some of these little magnets will soon fall and get lost behind the fridge — or get taken down because they’re ugly or creepy. (Medusa and Satan are not long for this world, I’m afraid.) But I am determined to keep most around long enough to explain to my daughter what they are and what they represent.

And at least one deity will stay for even longer… Paleolithic Buddha Goddess.

Paleolithic Buddha Goddess

She’s all mine.

*$14.95


2 comments

  1. Chris says:

    Damn. What’s your secret, Wendy? How is it that every post is better and/or funnier than the last? Well done you.

    So, true story: while on vacation in Nashville last summer, we stopped at Pangea (http://www.pangaeanashville.com), a fun and quirky little store that was always one of our faves when we lived there. Tucked away, almost hidden under various other trinkets and novelties, was another bit of pure genius: the What Would Jesus Wear magnetic dress-up set (http://www.philosophersguild.com/What-Would-Jesus-Wear.html). I snatched it up and immediately thought, “Holy crap. Wendy NEEDS this.” I carried it around for a few minutes until I realized that mailing it might be a bit weird (“Look, honey, some random stranger sent us Jesus magnets”), so I decided to just virtual gift it and email you about it. What’s that? You never got the email? …Oh, that’s because I forgot. But it’s the thought that counts, right? Right?

    I’ll just stand over here with the other fuckwits.

    Chris

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Due out in March 2015, Relax, It's Just God: How and Why to Talk to Your Kids About Religion When You're Not Religious offers a well-researched look at a timely subject: secular parenting. With chapters on avoiding indoctrination, talking about death, vaccinating kids against intolerance, dealing with religious baggage, and getting along with religious relatives, the book offers a refreshingly compassionate approach to raising religiously literate, highly tolerant and critically thinking children capable of making up their own minds about what to believe. The book may be pre-ordered by visiting Brown Paper Press.
 

      Natural Wonderers is a new blog hosted by Wendy Thomas Russell and published by the Patheos faith network. An extension of Russell's previous blog — Relax, It's Just God — Natural Wonderers offers stories and advice on raising curious, compassionate children in secular families.
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